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The Hawkeye May 2024
1st Amend Award School

2093 – A review from the future

Noah Smith, better known as Yeat, is an American rapper who became popular among youth in recent years. In Feb. 2024, he released an album called 2093, filled with a new era of music. Sophomore’s Soren Ramerman and Zack Yegremachew gave an overall rating of 7.5/10 for the album.
Album+cover+for+Yeat%E2%80%99s+project+2093%E2%80%99s+Phase+1+and+2.+Image+Courtesy+of+Field+Trip+Recording.
Album cover for Yeat’s project 2093’s Phase 1 and 2. Image Courtesy of Field Trip Recording.

Psycho CEO (Rating 7.5)
Yeat changed his whole sound completely with this song. The production is hard hitting and really strikes the emphasizing point that this is supposed to be futuristic. To get this straight across Yeat has never sounded legible to my ears with lyric to lyric. He is completely understandable and just delivers a beautiful futuristic piece of music to start off a new sound for a 23 year old rapper.

Power Trip (Rating 8.5)
I’m in shock, two songs over 3 and a half minutes on a Yeat album. The process this man has put himself through to become the top musician he possibly could be is huge. Zack Bia taking over Yeat’s brand has made this man a super villain. These two songs start with a protruding message of fear and stress to happen along the album. The amount of beat switches creates a different universe throughout the song.

Breathe (Rating 7.5)
Bia has made this man a defined artist. These vocals are just amazing, the attention to detail in the production cut to cut makes this song a glaring masterpiece. Yes, I know Yeat does not have the best lyrical abilities but production just makes up for it. The sample from the basketball car in the Regular Show is just a genius idea and I have no clue how ‘star boy’ and ‘bart how’ found this but it just works perfectly.

More (Rating 5.5)
This track reminds me of Spiderverse, the feeling of the futuristic sounds surrounding him as he raps makes it exciting and grabs the listeners attention. Despite the production being fun, Yeat does not perform at all on this song making it sound repetitive with not much depth to it. His voice is a very similar flow to all of the other tracks and the effects he uses don’t fit the beat.

I Bought The Earth (Rating 6)
Noah Smith [Yeat] takes a new approach to the style of vocals he uses, making it more raw and taking out most of the autotune. It feels like he’s trying to actually touch the listener and connect to them with a slower flow. As the song develops, the beat never progresses and stays stagnant as his voice gets this static sounding effect not adding any meat to a slow — even boring — song. It’s a solid track that would’ve been amazing if the end was cut.

Nothing Change (Rating 7.5)
One of his greatest rapping performances ever on a song. Nothing Change has an intense, loud, futuristic sound that has Yeat constantly stating that he is an alien and that he isn’t from this planet. This song is more to his roots with his performance but at the same time he’s keeping up the idea of actually making his voice clear enough to be understandable making this song a complete banger.

As We Speak Ft. Drake (Rating 7.5) (Feature Rating 7.5)
This track lacks fluidity. It doesn’t tie together well with the previous couple tracks and the performance from Yeat is underwhelming. His lyricism sticks on you after a while, the basicness of a 7th grader at times with his bars is Yeats biggest weakness. Catchiness derives from boring lyrics but for a 24 song project it gets redundant.

U Should Know (Rating 6)
Filler. Since Smith has gone mainstream, he has changed around and practiced new ideas in his music constantly but one thing that will always stick true is his laziness of making original tracks, instead he chooses filler. I can’t bear to hear “I know” one more time, Yeat is not about lyrics but he could at least say something smart.

Lyfestyle Ft. Lil Wayne (Rating 8) (Feature Rating 7)
Weeks on weeks have gone by building up my anticipation for this exact track. It met expectations, didn’t blow them out of the water. The inflection of the 808’s building up and down add a certain excitement to a groggy beat. Lil Wayne meets a standard on every feature but his flow on this one just didn’t feel the same as a normal Wayne hit. Yeat has mastered the art of creating something that is catchy but with very little meaning which makes it exciting and certainly distracts you from life.

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ILUV (Rating 9)
Yeat samples Crystal Castles song ‘Fleece’ which is just a perfection of a sample on a song making the beat rich and tasteful. Smith finds a way to incorporate such amazing production on every song and for the first time in a couple of times the lyrics are actually entertaining, fitting a dark mystic of lust and vilaness.

Tell Me (Rating 8.5)
2093 is an album made to represent the growth of Yeat but he seems to provide us listeners with a new message that he is now this mysterious figure with little to no backstory on him. He is portraying himself as a villain song after song as he embraces going to hell by saying “Yeah I love hell, hell on earth.” This snippet from the song provides context to the fact that he is not letting out truly who he is. This song is a beautiful ballet of electronic music straight into a violist solo at the end with him talking over it.

Shade (Rating 9.5)
Production, the synths are elevating this song to a beauty. As the synths fade up the beat becomes a more electronic feel again with a bouncing inside out sound to add depth. This track is not a rap feel and Yeat seems to just openly hit electronic feel at the start showing depth and growth as an artist. Artistically this song is a beauty with detail after detail in the beats and effects after effects. In all honesty this may be his greatest track ever, there is so much of a new bag he is reaching into and just pulling out a new feel on every song basically.

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About the Contributors
Soren Ramerman
Soren Ramerman, Sports Editor
Soren Ramerman joined HSM to pursue the idea of writing about sports and music reviews. Soren wants to create the opportunity forMTHS to learn about new music and sports. Soren enjoys running track doing the 800 and 400-meter races. He also enjoys listening toKanye West, Kendrick Lamar, and Travis Scott. He plans to attend either Washington State University or Eastern WashingtonUniversity after high school
Zack Yegremachew
Zack Yegremachew, Hawkeye Staff
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