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The student news site of Mountlake Terrace High School in Mountlake Terrace, Washington.

The Hawkeye

The student news site of Mountlake Terrace High School in Mountlake Terrace, Washington.

The Hawkeye

The student news site of Mountlake Terrace High School in Mountlake Terrace, Washington.

The Hawkeye

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The Hawkeye May 2024
1st Amend Award School

Chilly takes on the world

Michael+Russel%2C+under+Zach+Rogers+supervision%2C+swaps+out+the+last+swerve+wheel+for+one+with+fresh+tread.
©HAWKEYE image credit: Curtis Gilchrist
Michael Russel, under Zach Rogers’ supervision, swaps out the last swerve wheel for one with fresh tread.

For the first time in six years Terrace’s Chill Out, FRC (FIRST Robotics Competition) team 1778, flew down to Houston, Texas competing against over 600 of the best teams in the world for five days.
Placing 24th internationally, 20th across the US and first in Washington state – the team has the pride to bring home to Terrace as well as the memories they made along the way.
Leading up to the competition, Chill Out was excited and proud of the season they had this year and how they hoped to do in Worlds. Sending their bot, Zappy Feet, to Houston a few days ahead of time, junior Cyrus McMillion, cheer lead of the club, said he felt “all of the above (nervous, excited, stressed)… We’re only going to have two days to work on the robot between District and Worlds.”
Following the competition, the team felt amazing. “Although it wasn’t the most ideal situation, we made the most out of it and got to win so overall everyone.. is super proud of ourselves.” McMillion said.
The first days of competition were simply practice, setting their pit up and then qualifying in the Newton Division.
Long days and plenty of matches later, they made the playoffs in their division with an alliance with teams Code Orange from California 3476, Yeti Robotics from North Carolina 3506 and Ram Tech from Florida 59. Together they won one match and lost two others leading to the end of their time in Houston. That same day, the other Edmonds School District team: Royal Robotics of Lynnwood High School also advanced to playoffs.
Through the competition many students made fond memories of their time in Houston.
Describing the matches as “like having a heart attack,” McMillion says “I’m sure it’s worse for the drive team. It’s really an experience to watch these robots run around and see something you worked on, [you can] compete and succeed at that.”
Beyond just a robotics competition full of stress with back to back matches and working in the pit, Worlds in Houston for Chill Out is remembered fondly by all students who’ve attended.

Although it wasn’t the most ideal situation, we made the most out of it and got to win so overall everyone… is super proud of ourselves.”

— Cyrus McMillion


Many attended Robo-Prom to supplement the hundreds of students who are missing their own prom for the championship competition, some even saying it’s better than real prom. Chill Out had many of their students attending together with matching attire.
As AP season was arriving, some students in the team spent time completing homework and reviewing assignments instead of hanging with the team in order to stay caught up for exams and be prepared for the many tests to come.
Before Worlds though, Chill Out had massive success at the Pacific Northwest competitions to celebrate.

Isaac Mach points out to Ian O’Brian that the new intake is askew and twisting. After Ian tightens the bolts and fixes the tension, the bot is ready to queue again. (©HAWKEYE image credit: Curtis Gilchrist)

Traveling to Portland, Oregon for spring break, students, parents and mentors competed against some of the best FRC teams in the Pacific Northwest. Over the three day competition, 1778 Chill Out placed sixth overall. At this competition, worldwide they placed 43rd, 38th in the nation, 4th in the Pacific Northwest, and in Washington State alone: third. Although they missed advancing to the semifinals by a few points, they were able to qualify for Worlds and climb up the ranks.

“The game has been fun. The robot has been a joy to work with. It’s just getting better and better.” McMillion said.
On the first day of the competition, students arrived to set up their pit, attend the opening ceremony and the following day were the qualifying matches. On the third day, there were alliance and playoff matches where the team was able to make district records and even a world record for some time.
Throughout the three days, Chill Out 1778 had accomplished so much for one team, with members from Terrace as well as neighboring Edmonds-Woodway, and working with our rival school in a match alliance Lynnwood High School, Royal Robotics 2522.
The team was able to set and hold records for the Pacific Northwest District with a score of 51 points for autonomous and the highest teleoperated score of 97 points. They temporarily set an international record twice during the season, for the highest-ever score without penalties and for the highest-ever score of 157. The high scores would later be beaten by a Canadian team, but in the entirety of the Pacific Northwest, two of Edmonds School District’s high schools hold the record.
Chill Out 1778 also received the Imagery Award, which is in honor of Jack Kamen, the founder of FRC’s father in remembrance and dedication to art and devotion to FRC. This award celebrates a team’s engineering towards visual aesthetics with the integration of machine and appearance. Chill Out won this award for their ability to integrate an original and attractive theme into Zappy Feet, as well as the team’s decor of their pit and amazing outfits with bow ties and top hats reflecting their mascot, a penguin.
The team is proud of such an amazing season this year and is now looking forward to the next one with a change in leadership and a plan looking ahead.

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About the Contributors
Kaylee Miyamoto
Kaylee Miyamoto, Online Manager
Curtis Gilchrist
Curtis Gilchrist, Online Design Editor
Curtis Gilchrist first joined HSM in 2021 to learn design and layout and contribute his photography knowledge. In his role as a photographer and designer, he solves the problem that is ugly and unreadable papers. In his free time, he uses his prowess in the other forms of design to solve problems. After he graduates, he hopes to go to college and study engineering and computer science so he can expand his designs further.
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