Former teacher to be inducted into Snohomish County Sports Hall of Fame

By Desmond Saisitthidej

Ed Aliverti – an original MTHS staff member – will be inducted into the Snohomish County Sports Hall of Fame later this month.

Perhaps best known in the sports world as the voice of amateur wrestling, Aliverti passed away on February 3, 2010 following a lengthy battle with cancer. He was 77.

Ed started his amazing story in Walla Walla, Wash. where he was born in 1932.

He graduated from Walla Walla High school a Valedictorian in 1950; then attended WSU and graduated Cum Laude in 1955. Ed then worked at Edmonds High School until 1960.

Ed announced his first wrestling meet in 1958 at Edmonds High School, and from there his career as an announcer took off.

In the fall of 1960, Ed helped open Mountlake Terrace High School and founded its music program becoming the first vocal music instructor from 1960 until 1967. He then he served as a counselor until 1971.

From there he moved on to Lynnwood High School where he worked as a counselor until 1976. Then he moved to Edmonds Community College until he retired in 1988.

Even though Ed retired, his work and love of wrestling continued on. Many believe that Ed only got busier after his retirement taking up more wrestling events with his wife, Shirley, at his side.

Ed had many talents other than his ability to announce and would often bring his musical abilities to the wrestling microphone. He sang the American national anthem to open many wrestling tournaments, and also learned the national anthems of Japan, Canada, France, Cuba and Korea.

Ed has been inducted into several halls of fame, including the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, the NAIA Wrestling Hall of Fame, the Washington State Wrestling Coaches Hall of Fame, the Terrace Sports Hall of Fame, and on September 22, 2011 the Snohomish County Sports Hall of Fame.

Ed was famous for his ability to announce wrestling matches that featured multiple mats. His voice radiated throughout the arenas calling attention to rapidly developing matches and extraordinary athletes.

Ed participated in hundreds of events around the globe ranging from local high school wrestling matches to announcing the Olympic games from 1984 until 2004.

Ed never wrestled himself, but his love for the game is evident in that he frequently referred to wrestling as “the world’s oldest and greatest sport.”

The Aliverti’s were exceedingly active in the community, and all three of Ed and Shirley’s daughters graduated from Edmonds High School.