Defining a place in society

By Hawkeye Staff

In Washington the acceptance of homosexuality is a common topic. Which is good, in a way, but when entire assemblies are based around them, it’s definitely not agreeable.
Even though the words that are being said tell people that homosexuals should be treated the same way as heterosexuals, the fact that an assembly is, for the most part, because of homosexuals, it’s telling people “we [homosexuals] deserve an entire hour because we’re the same as you.”

Hold on a minute, if this lifestyle is normal, why is it getting so much attention? It also bugs me that the National Day of Silence is a holiday dedicated to homosexuals. I get that homosexuals suffer and have suffered just because of who they are, but blacks don’t get a holiday. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day is not a holiday for blacks; it’s for a leader, not a race.

Where’s the holiday for the Jewish? I don’t mean their religious holidays; I mean a holiday that was made in response to their suffering and discrimination. There is none. Well, it seems to me that for such a normal thing, homosexuals are getting quite a bit of unnecessary attention.
Before you decide to start hating this piece of writing as well as me, homosexuality is a doubtlessly natural thing, and I’m aware of this, and thusly support it.
My first point is that for such a minor thing, and yes, discrimination against homosexuals is a minor thing—go read about the enslavement of blacks or this thing called the Holocaust—it’s receiving an incredibly excessive amount of attention, particularly considering the goal that is trying to be reached. It seems that homosexuals want to be noticed more than they want to be accepted.

Now on to my second point, since when is not talking an appropriate way of getting a message across? Nobody hears about unhappy employees not speaking because they want better work conditions. No, they go and picket.
“But how do you picket discrimination against homosexuals?” one might ask, and I’ll tell you how. Or, even better, a person previously mentioned can show you how. Dr. King is a great example of how discrimination can be fought, and I think the homosexual community should learn from his example.

On a final note, if you’re going to support the day, take it seriously. A not-to-be-named student started out the day using electronics to communicate with others, in spirit of the holiday. Nine minutes into first period, they decided they “gave up.” Seriously? It’s not a game. Nor is it a challenge. It’s to show support, not see how long you can last without talking.

Additionally, when I pointed out the failure of dedication, the anonymous student responded, “At least I’m showing support,” and motioned to the pink triangle on their shirt. I’m really getting sick of people thinking that there’s a “correct opinion”. Even though I support gay marriage, otherwise known as “marriage,” it disgusts me that people think that there’s only one opinion. If that were true, there would be no need to show support.

I was recently told that the opinion of a homosexual friend of mine concerning homophobic terms doesn’t matter because he’s not an “active member of the gay community.” So, apparently only “active members” matter. If this were true, the only homosexuals that matter would be the ones that make an enormous deal about their sexuality.
It blows my mind that the same people requesting absolute tolerance can be so incredibly intolerant. It’s the huge fuss that’s being made over this newly discriminated sexuality that happens to be the exact reason why it’s discriminated against.
People think that it’s not normal because it’s made into such a controversial subject, even though it’s a completely natural occurrence and is observed relatively frequently in wild populations of all kinds of animals.

If homosexuality is going to be accepted by this great, although failing nation, it needs to be normalized, not shoved in everyone’s faces as something that absolutely needs to be accepted.