STEM Expo 2016 showcases diversity, creativity of ideas

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Last Monday, April 18, students involved in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math [STEM] programs in grades 4-12 came to MTHS to present the projects they have been working on. These students come from all over the districts to share their projects and ideas at the STEM Expo.

MTHS junior, Kai Hiar, talked about her experience with the police, and how it influenced her project, titled “How to Get Away With Murder.”

“Over the last couple years, I have been obsessed with Murder Mysteries, and I am currently a Lynnwood Police Explorer, which gives me a lot of insight on how police officers do what they do.” Hiar said.

She has been working on her project for about 3 months, and has already done all the research, written a 12 page essay, and made a small documentary film.

MTHS senior Bonnie Winters had a similar project. “I did Forensic Botany, which is the use of plants in a criminal investigation,” she stated. She also had a project titled “Phytoremediation of Lead Contaminated Soil in Using Herbaceous Angiosperms,” in which she studied how to use plants in order to get lead out of soil.

“I have a passion for botany, and flowers,” Winters said, explaining how she got the idea for the two projects. “I have also wanted to apply something to the real world, and more home grown, more locally applicable.”

Not all student projects were about Forensics or botany, however. The event featured anything from alkaseltzer experiments conducted by elementary students to the application of robots in the medical field.

Some MTHS students took advantage of opportunity to work in teams, such as junior Liza Manevich and freshman Cameron Ferguson. As a group, they attempted to recreate “The Hidden Blade,” from the popular action-adventure video game Assassin’s Creed.

“We didn’t have a lot of luck with that, we ended up with a few prototypes that didn’t exactly work because of mechanism problems,” Manevich stated, “but we’re hoping to fix that soon, and fully achieve our goal,” Manevich stated.

Not just individual students came, clubs and organizations from other schools did as well. Making an appearance were the robotics teams from MTHS, Lynnwood High School and Edmonds Heights, Technology Student Association from MTHS and Brier Terrace Middle School, MTHS rocketry, and Auto from Meadowdale High School.